A department-by-department guide to cutting the government's budget.

Department of Energy

The Department of Energy oversees nuclear weapons sites, runs electric utilities, and subsidizes conventional and alternative fuels.

The department will spend $30 billion in 2015, or about $243 for every U.S. household. It employs 16,000 workers directly and oversees about 100,000 contract workers.

Department of Health and Human Services

The Department of Health and Human Services administers Medicare, Medicaid, and hundreds of other subsidy and welfare programs.

The department will spend $1.012 trillion in 2015, or about $8,235 for every U.S. household. It employs 73,000 workers and operates more than 520 subsidy programs.

Department of Housing and Urban Development

The Department of Housing and Urban Development funds public housing, provides rental vouchers, and subsidizes homeownership.

The department will spend $42 billion in 2015, or about $341 for every U.S. household. It employs 8,600 workers and operates 116 subsidy programs.

From the Downsizing Blog

Federal Subsidies Miss Target

The Wall Street Journal today discusses how the growth in federal subsidies for college has contributed to the growth in college costs for students. Cato scholars have been arguing for years that rising grants and loans are not so much helping students, but causing bloat in college administration costs, including wages, benefits, and excess building construction.

Coercion Is Bad Economics

A common feature of Obama administration economic policies is the use of government coercion. The Obamacare health law mandated that individuals buy insurance. The administration’s tax increases grabbed more earnings from millions of people. And federal agencies are imposing an increasing pile of labor, environmental, and financial regulations on businesses.

Jared Bernstein Tilts His Tax Facts

Former Obama administration economist, Jared Bernstein, argues for higher taxes in a New York Times op-ed yesterday. His piece begins:

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